Archive for October, 2010

Week 7 – Foresight

To have foresight means to have the ability to understand lessons from the past.  A Servant Leader must have the ability to foresee or know the likely outcome of a given situation.    Hopefully, you are not just guessing your way through life and hoping for the best.  Leaders can develop the skill of foresight through their experiences on the job and in life.  All of us have foresight; we just need to develop the skill of recognizing it in order to solve problems that are creative, emotional, intellectual, or practical.

Foresight means looking at what is happening right now and comparing it to what has happened in the past and the result that came of it.  At the same time, the leader has to project what will happen in the future.  It is essential that leaders develop this skill as it has the power to transform organizations and lives.

A forward-looking person has the ability to analyze any situation with the foresight necessary to make decisions.  Foresight is a characteristic that enables the Servant Leader to understand the lessons from the past, the realities of the present, and the likely consequence of a decision for the future.  To get really good at foresight, one must develop the intuitive mind.  There are many ways in which you can develop your skill of foresight.  Some may work for you and some may not.  The key is to try as many of them as you can in order to find the ones with which you are the most comfortable.

Follow some of the suggestions in this week’s lesson and you will begin to develop your intuitive mind to enhance your ability to use the skill of foresight.

Monday’s Lesson #1 – Focus on the Issue

~Identify the issue(s)

~Prioritize the issues

~Review the organization’s mission

Tuesday’s Lesson #2 – Scan the Environment

~Try to determine the POSSIBLE future

~Try to determine the PROBABLE future

~Try to determine the PREFERRED future

Wednesday’s Lesson #3 – Set the Vision

~Envision the future

~Jot down the images that come to mind

~Tell people what your specific vision is

Thursday’s Lesson #4 – Develop the Plan

~Consider the range of possible futures – what is the best for the organization?

~Develop specific goals and strategies to move in the direction of the desired future

~Organize and implement a planning development session

Friday’s Lesson #5 – Put the Plan into Action

~Define what processes will be changed

~Determine how progress will be evaluated

~Indicate who will be responsible for which strategies

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

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Today was a complete blast! It was my second commercial for a local hospital’s affiliate clinic and third for this agency. What a wonderful hobby and big fun, too. (Thanks, God!)

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One thing was certain about today’s shoot: everyone was a great sport about the pictures.  Thank you! For that reason, I was able to capture a nice reel of pictures to photo journal my fantastic day! (If it’s not, don’t tell me!) We had a ball!

The Cast and Crew On Our Set… Notice the actors and their varied facial expressions.  Some do commercials all of the time, some sing, some are puppeteers. The production company, Pollaro Media, is family owned and it’s always very cool to work with these guys.   RadioVision’s, Deborah Gerard takes great care of her actors and for that we thank you!

Last take…Now—> LUNCH

Louie directs this second shoot on another set on campus. 

Deborah Gerard, MVP and keeper/distributor of the checks!

Robert and most of the cast live in Dallas. It’s a WRAP!

 

1. Do not ever put them down or make fun of them. Try not to raise your voice excessively. It’s disrespectful and will defeat your purpose, not to mention over time, it’s completely ineffective.

2. Listen attentively to what they tell you and pay attention to the body language of what they are not saying.  If you don’t, over time they won’t be as likely to share with you.

3. Take their ideas, dreams, suggestions and opinions seriously.  Then respond accordingly.

4. Respect their feelings and each child’s unique personality and identity.

5. Insist that they show respect to others.  This is most often taught by your own actions.

6. Be patient – whatever that looks like for you, make an effort to improve by being even more understanding.

7. Show appreciation by being generous with genuine compliments.

8. Focus on strengths by commenting often on what is done well.  Once you know the challenges of this young person, make an effort to help him or her get the support they need to be a success.

9. Show confidence in the young person by encouraging him or her often.

10. Be authentic and be consistent!

(Caution: All of these suggestions may prove useful with adults, too!)

Conceptualization is the ability to nurture others to dream great dreams.  The ability to conceptualize allows Servant Leaders to create the vision in which to lead their organizations effectively towards a goal.  The people who can conceptualize are those who have refined skills in persuasion and relationship building.

Conceptualization is a process of thinking and organizing ideas.  This process begins with the learning of facts and progresses to concepts that contribute to the development of theory.  The Servant Leader must be able to set goals that consider future possibilities.  In order to fully develop the skill of conceptualization, the Servant Leader must remain positive and realistic all at the same time.  That takes some skill.  It is easy for us to create outrageous goals, but are we ever really going to achieve them?  It is also easy for us to dream small and make simple goals that we can achieve immediately.  Those short term goals are good but effective leaders are able to make long term goals that are difficult but not impossible to achieve.  In order to set this type of goal, the leader must be able to use a variety of skills.  This week, we will work toward developing all the necessary skills to become a great Servant Leader who can conceptualize.

 

 

Monday’s Lesson #1 – Set Goals

~Set personal and professional goals

~Create the “big pictures” of what you want to do with your life

~Establish targets for reaching your goals

 


Tuesday’s Lesson #2 – Get Organized

~Set up a filing system

~Color code your files

~Use a calendar and/or planner

 


Wednesday’s Lesson #3 – Analyze the Situation

~Analyze those that work and live with you

~Formulate goals and objectives

~Research the history of the situation

 


Thursday’s Lesson #4 – Monitor Progress

~Schedule periodic check-up meetings

~Review data

~Conduct site visits

Friday’s Lesson #5 – Plan and Evaluate

~Review the goals

~Evaluate your efforts in order to improve and promote effectiveness

~Use questionnaires, surveys, and interviews

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Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

So…Beyonce’s little sister, Solange, cut her hair off, revealing a teeny-weeny afro. Fabulous, right? No?  Why not?

Solange’s bold new look was the #3 trending topic on Twitter for several days after she first was photographed with it. Some comments on Twitter and various blogs were complimentary, but the overwhelming majority was painfully critical of Solange’s natural mane. Samplings of comments from the blogosphere include:

For Complete Article, Click Here * Thanks for reading!

Sharon is a community college administrator, former special education teacher, wife of 17 years and mother of two school-age children in northwest Houston. Her primary interests are family-inclusive culture and arts, travel, politics, historical literature, Texas Longhorns and all things Disney.  She writes for the Houston Examiner as a featured columnist.  We have been friends since ‘the crib days.’

I have good news for you.  You don’t have to be a slick salesperson in order to be persuasive.  The skill of persuasion is simply the ability to convince others rather than coercing compliance. The Servant Leader primarily relies on making decisions within an organization based on persuasion rather than positional authority.  In other words, you will never hear the Servant Leader say, “do it because I am the boss and I say to.”  This particular element offers one of the clearest distinctions between the traditional authoritarian model of leadership and the concept of servant leadership.  The technique of convincing rather than coercing is one of the most effective ways a Servant Leader can build consensus within groups.

Instead of making a big deal about something and telling your colleagues that they have to change, “or else,” the Servant Leader has learned to use a method of gentle but clear and persistent persuasion.  Leadership by persuasion has the ability to encourage change by convincement rather than coercion.  Its advantages are enormous.  Just think about it, aren’t you more apt to make a change if someone has convinced you of it as opposed to telling you that you MUST change because the boss said so?  Persuasion is ultimately about relationships.  Effective leaders are able to form bonds with others that result in relationships.  These relationships allow for open communication that lay the way for trust.  People who trust you will be more easily persuaded by you.

 

A final point to keep in mind is this…effective Servant Leaders who are great persuaders don’t ask themselves, “who can help me?” but instead ask, “whom can I help?”  There are some basic techniques that can help you develop your persuasive skills.  I hope you will try some of them this week and join me on this great journey to become the most effective Servant Leader we can be.

Monday’s Lesson #1 – Create Transparency

Be responsible for the information you share

Be truthful

When you give your opinion, think through the implications

Tuesday’s Lesson #2 – Practice Fairness

Always give others the credit they deserve

Clearly communicate with others

Listen to others

Wednesday’s Lesson #3  – Develop Consistency

Use a planner or calendar

Be accountable to someone

Identify your core set of values

Thursday’s Lesson #4 – Build Consensus

Structure discussions so they remain focused

List issue on paper

Ask everyone “can you support our final choice?”

Friday’s Lesson #5 – Create Relationships

Balance giving and receiving

Speak a little less, listen a little more

Avoid gossip

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of The Main Thing Leadership Coaching Firm and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.


Do you have tons of summer vacation pictures laying around and don’t know what to do with them?  Why don’t you put them in a scrapbook?  Scrapbooking is a hobby that will preserve your family’s most special moments for years to come.  Just follow the following easy steps to begin your memory project:

  1. Divide your photos into themes.  For example, sort all the photos taken at the beach this summer.
  2. Select acid-free paper or cardstock that will compliment the colors that appear in your photos.  For beach pictures, look for blues, browns, and tans.
  3. Select one of your photos to be the focus of your first page.
  4. For your focus photo, select paper to serve as a mat for the photo.
  5. Be sure to add your journaling.  On a tag or square of paper use your own handwriting to jot down a few details of the trip.
  6. Add embellishments such as stickers, shells, tags, etc.
  7. Use acid free adhesive to adhere all photos to the paper.

While working through these steps there are a few things you will want to consider: 

1. Journaling is such a special part of scrapbooking.  Our photos tell part of the story but the journaling will document parts of the story that the photos can’t tell.  When journaling, try to always use your handwriting.  Make sure to include the who, what, when, and where as well as your thoughts and feelings.  Remember, that your family will look at this scrapbook page for years to come so make sure your journaling tells the reader what the photo can’t.

2. Memorabilia is great to include in your scrapbooks.  Make sure you keep your ticket stubs, small shells, maps, etc.  Place these items in your scrapbook along with your photos and journaling to complete the story.

3. One last thing to consider is cropping.  I do not recommend cutting your photos.  You never know when the background in the photo will become as important as the focus of the photo.

These easy steps should have you well on your way to documenting your family’s most special memories.

What memories are sparked when you think of your childhood summer vacations? Do you reflect fondly on summers you spent surfing the internet, text messaging friends or laughing hysterically at YouTube clips? Did you make the most of hot summer days by virtual hiking and fishing on your Wii or Playstation? Do you remember how much you enjoyed frolicking online with your Sims family and your digital pet Webkinz?  Heck, no…you knew how to go outside and P-L-A-Y.

If you were like me, the best summer vacations EVER required a swimsuit, some neighborhood buddies and a yard sprinkler.  We said “goodbye” to our mamas around 10:30am and “hello” right before the street lights came on.

For Complete Article, Click Here * Thanks for reading!

Most leaders have a general awareness, but do you have the unique self-awareness that allows you to view most situations more holistically?  It is essential that we learn how to make the connection between what we know and believe to what we say or do in order to lead effectively.  I’m sure you have heard people say, if only “he/she would walk the talk.”

“Leaders and managers say they want change and improvement, but their actions do not match their words.”  And, I’m sure you have heard leaders and parents say, “just do what I say, not what I do.”

Do you do what you say?  Do you ask others to do what you would never do?  Once you find out something is not right, guess what….you have the responsibility to fix it.  The solution to the problem then applies to you as well.

Let me give you an example.  You go to work and you notice that one of your employees is parking in the Handicapped parking space- right next to the front door.  When you enter the office, you meet with that employee and tell him/her that they should refrain from parking in that space unless they have a permit to do so.

The employee states that she was ‘in a hurry and was just running in the office to grab a file’ before heading to a meeting.  You follow up with an email to everyone in the department reminding them that Handicapped parking spaces are reserved for those with an appropriate permit to park there. You direct them all to not use that slot unless they have the permit to do so.

Fast forward the time and you find yourself in a position where you are in a hurry to meet with your boss but first need to pick up some paperwork at the office.  There are no parking spaces available except (you guessed it) the Handicapped one by the front door.

You know it will only take 3 seconds to go in the office, get the paperwork, and return to the car. You don’t think anyone will see you park there.   What do you do?   Well, I bet you know the answer, but still what do you do?  A person who has refined his/her awareness skill is able to look at this situation holistically and will know that parking in that space is not an option.

However, a person that is lacking in awareness will never address the problem from the very beginning with the employee parking there.  Many times people will bury their heads in the sand (so to speak) just so they can claim they were not aware of a problem.  Again, if you are aware…you have to do something about it and you just might not find that your solution to the problem is convenient for you.

According to Robert Greenleaf, “awareness is not a giver of solace.  It is a disturber and an awakener.”

Servant Leaders are usually both acutely aware and somewhat disturbed.  Because we all deal with issues of ethics and morality, we need to work on our ability to be aware and to do what we ask of others.

If you work in an organization, you’ve heard the complaint that many times the leader’s actions are contradictory to the change he/she is requiring of others.  The power to change your organization’s environment and culture is yours.  Start here to learn how to walk your talk.  I promise, it’s the shortest journey to transform the work and home environment we all so desire.

Lesson #1 – Champion Others

*Show support for a colleague’s idea in a meeting

*Pitch in and help a colleague or family member with a project

*Lend a hand

Lesson #2 – Model the behavior you want to see in others

*Act as if you are part of the team, not always the boss of it

*If you make a rule, follow it

*Be clear about expectations for yourself and others

Lesson #3 – Help people achieve goals that are important to them

*Research and read daily

*Make sure your colleagues have set goals for themselves

*Ask open ended questions

Lesson #4 – Follow Through!!!

*Don’t be afraid to say, “I don’t know.

*Do what you say you are going to do

*Don’t make rash promises that you can’t keep

Lesson #5 – Use Communication Tools

*Collect testimonials and recommendations and share them

*Build support for your organization’s big goal

*Focus your meetings on the big goal

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of the Leadership Empowerment Group and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

Recently, I was blessed to return to my alma mater, Baylor University, to present  a workshop that I created called “Everybody Matters.”  What a joy the Graduate School of Social Work Students were in this (four combined sections of) Individuals and Families Practice class.  Those two hours just zoomed on by!  It was truly wonderful.

The makings of great sessions always lie in the hands of each audience  and their level of participation.  I love that because you never know what you are going to get!

For example, a long time and very dear friend, who works in the building where the presentation was made, came by to support me.  Just before she arrived, I discovered that she had previously addressed another set of social work students and ended her presentation with a riveting a cappella, “If I Can Help Somebody.”  Without warning, one of the professors asked her to repeat her solo for this session and she graciously agreed.  That’s how we started and none of that was planned.  It was fabulous how it all worked out.

In fact, it turned out to be absolutely perfect.  Shortly thereafter – during  the introductions section – one student then felt comfortable enough to not only tell us about a major celebration in his home country but also delivered his own rivoting solo for us-a very upbeat and happy sounding traditional Chinese song! This was just our first fifteen minutes together!  Like I said, you never know what will happen. That is one of the most beautiful aspects of this work, celebrating our similarities and differences!

Ok, enough from me.  Let’s hear from the students!

Q: Name one or more useful thing that you will take away from this workshop.

A: “I loved hearing other’s feelings about their group.  I have heard all the stereotypes and it was so enlightening & helpful to hear their feelings about having those stereotypes about their group.”

Stephanie Drum

A: “Respect everyone because everyone is important.”

Catina Hart

Q: How can this information be helpful in your career?

A: “Reminder that there’s always more to the story.”

Julie Coston

A: “Not only in Social Work but life, being more aware of diversity and being respectful.”

Carolina Fuentes

Q: How can this information be helpful in your career?

A: “Awareness & a motivation to be an agent of change.”

Britany Lewis

A: “Understanding that we are all a part of some stereotype.”

Kristen Tekell

Q: In your opinion, for what other classes and/or groups would this workshop be beneficial?

A: “Affluent, our priviledged”

Joshua Tan

A: “Everybody”

Sovannara Moch

Q: In your opinion, for what other classes and/or groups would this workshop be beneficial?

A: “Everyone can take this class because we live in a diverse world.”

Xujun Li

Q: In your opinion, for what other classes and/or groups would this workshop be beneficial?

A: “Training for Campus Living & Learning Resident Assistants”

Heather Mustain

A: “Seminary, law, education, business, nursing, et al…” Various respondents

Q: In your opinion, for what other classes and/or groups would this workshop be beneficial?

A: “Diversity inclusion is a needed skill for everyone in any profession.”

Joy Ekpin

A: “Everyone can benefit from this workshop.”

Beatriz Ramos

Thank you all for agreeing to allow use of your testimonials.  You are all Stars in my eyes!  Thank you for committing to the profession of helping change people’s lives.  This entry is dedicated to YOU and Everyone in a profession helping people!

Feel free to visit www.oneinabillionconsulting.com for additional  information, including testimonials and videos.  Yes, there are more.  We’re One in a Billion Consulting, remember? =D

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Special thanks to Dr. Erma Ballenger, Director of Graduate Field Education for both invitations to present.

2010 Baylor Social Work Annual Family Dinner

Big Blessings!!!