Archive for September, 2010

Lesson #4 – Random Acts of Kindness

*When ordering in a drive thru, pay for the person’s order behind you

**Randomly smile at strangers

***Help someone carry their groceries to the car

***Make an anonymous

donation to a charity of your choice

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of the Leadership Empowerment Group and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

Lesson #3 – Keep Your Emotions Under Control

  • Think before you act  
  • Listen to calming music  
  • Read an uplifting article  
  • Set up your workplace to encourage relaxation and production  The entire article and all five lessons follow:

Can You Heal a Broken Spirit? by Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa

Don’t you wish you could help those with a broken spirit?  Well, you can.  The word healing really means to help make whole.  The search for wholeness is something shared by the Servant Leader and the followers.  The Servant Leader is aware that in order for a person to grow professionally and personally, that person must first be whole and not broken emotionally.  Learning to heal is a powerful force for transforming our lives and the lives of others.  One of the greatest strengths of Servant Leadership is the potential for healing one’s self and others.  Servant Leaders recognize that they have an opportunity (and a responsibility) to help those with broken spirits and those who are suffering.  What a powerful concept!  Just think about it for a minute, you and I have the ability to help heal a person and make him/her whole again.  Imagine that!

The characteristic of healing recognizes that people’s work lives and personal lives are integrated.  A leader must be willing and able to recognize people who are able to perform better at work because of (not apart from) their activities and relationships outside the work environment.  For example, the work performance of a person who is dealing with a personal problem will be directly impacted. The two worlds are related, even if we wish they weren’t at times.

In “The Servant as Leader,” Robert Greenleaf writes, “There is something subtle communicated to one who is being served and led if, implicit in the compact between the servant-leader and led is the understanding that the search for wholeness is something that they have.”  The concept of healing is central to the consciousness of most professions and is definitely central to the core of a Servant Leader.

Servant Leaders are people who others want to approach when something traumatic happens.  These leaders have developed a remarkable appreciation for the emotional health and spirit of others.  This appreciation for others’ spirit has helped the Servant Leader learn how to facilitate the healing process so that others gravitate toward them when emotional needs arise.  The ability to create an environment that encourages emotional mending is crucial for those who want to become great Servant Leaders.

This week’s lesson on Healing reminds us of the awesome responsibility we have as leaders both in our homes and in our workplaces. As stated in the Bible, (1 Corinthians 12:9 NKJV) “to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit.”  We have been blessed with the ability to break someone down or make them whole.  What do you choose?  Remember that one very important way to determine the effectiveness of a leader is to examine the followers.  Are they happy, have they grown professionally and personally under the leadership of the Servant Leader?  The following activities will help you promote your healing skills and lead you to becoming a more Servant Leader.  And….it just might make this world a better place.

Lesson #1 – Self Awareness

  • Recognize your own needs
  • Reflect daily on your personal and professional goals
  • Are you allowing and helping others to grow?
  • Be prepared to listen to others’ opinion of you

Lesson #2 – Cultivate Compassion

  • Discover what you have in common with other people
  • Seize opportunities to model sympathetic feelings for others
  • Practice your listening skills
  • Research problems around the world – learn more

Lesson #3 – Keep Your Emotions Under Control

  • Think before you act
  • Listen to calming music
  • Read an uplifting article
  • Set up your workplace to encourage relaxation and production

Lesson #4 – Random Acts of Kindness

  • When ordering in a drive thru, pay for the person’s order behind you
  • Randomly smile at strangers
  • Help someone carry their groceries to the car
  • Make and anonymous donation to a charity of your choice

Lesson #5 – Develop Your Emotional Intelligence

  • Develop an appetite for learning
  • Inspire good feelings through pleasant social interactions
  • Reflect on people who model healing, such as Mother Teresa
  • Have an open mind and positive mental attitude

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of the Leadership Empowerment Group and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

Lesson #2 – Cultivate Compassion

  • Discover what you have in common with other people
  • Seize opportunities to model sympathetic feelings for others
  • Practice your listening skills
  • Research problems around the world – learn more

The entire article and all five lessons follow:

Can You Heal a Broken Spirit? by Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa

Don’t you wish you could help those with a broken spirit?  Well, you can.  The word healing really means to help make whole.  The search for wholeness is something shared by the Servant Leader and the followers.  The Servant Leader is aware that in order for a person to grow professionally and personally, that person must first be whole and not broken emotionally.  Learning to heal is a powerful force for transforming our lives and the lives of others.  One of the greatest strengths of Servant Leadership is the potential for healing one’s self and others.  Servant Leaders recognize that they have an opportunity (and a responsibility) to help those with broken spirits and those who are suffering.  What a powerful concept!  Just think about it for a minute, you and I have the ability to help heal a person and make him/her whole again.  Imagine that!

The characteristic of healing recognizes that people’s work lives and personal lives are integrated.  A leader must be willing and able to recognize people who are able to perform better at work because of (not apart from) their activities and relationships outside the work environment.  For example, the work performance of a person who is dealing with a personal problem will be directly impacted. The two worlds are related, even if we wish they weren’t at times.

In “The Servant as Leader,” Robert Greenleaf writes, “There is something subtle communicated to one who is being served and led if, implicit in the compact between the servant-leader and led is the understanding that the search for wholeness is something that they have.”  The concept of healing is central to the consciousness of most professions and is definitely central to the core of a Servant Leader.

Servant Leaders are people who others want to approach when something traumatic happens.  These leaders have developed a remarkable appreciation for the emotional health and spirit of others.  This appreciation for others’ spirit has helped the Servant Leader learn how to facilitate the healing process so that others gravitate toward them when emotional needs arise.  The ability to create an environment that encourages emotional mending is crucial for those who want to become great Servant Leaders.

This week’s lesson on Healing reminds us of the awesome responsibility we have as leaders both in our homes and in our workplaces. As stated in the Bible, (1 Corinthians 12:9 NKJV) “to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit.”  We have been blessed with the ability to break someone down or make them whole.  What do you choose?  Remember that one very important way to determine the effectiveness of a leader is to examine the followers.  Are they happy, have they grown professionally and personally under the leadership of the Servant Leader?  The following activities will help you promote your healing skills and lead you to becoming a more Servant Leader.  And….it just might make this world a better place.

Lesson #1 – Self Awareness

  • Recognize your own needs
  • Reflect daily on your personal and professional goals
  • Are you allowing and helping others to grow?
  • Be prepared to listen to others’ opinion of you

Lesson #2 – Cultivate Compassion

  • Discover what you have in common with other people
  • Seize opportunities to model sympathetic feelings for others
  • Practice your listening skills
  • Research problems around the world – learn more

Lesson #3 – Keep Your Emotions Under Control

  • Think before you act
  • Listen to calming music
  • Read an uplifting article
  • Set up your workplace to encourage relaxation and production

Lesson #4 – Random Acts of Kindness

  • When ordering in a drive thru, pay for the person’s order behind you
  • Randomly smile at strangers
  • Help someone carry their groceries to the car
  • Make and anonymous donation to a charity of your choice

Lesson #5 – Develop Your Emotional Intelligence

  • Develop an appetite for learning
  • Inspire good feelings through pleasant social interactions
  • Reflect on people who model healing, such as Mother Teresa
  • Have an open mind and positive mental attitude

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of the Leadership Empowerment Group and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.

One might think that my aptitude to scientifically observe, evaluate and categorize human enterprise is due to having earned a degree in sociology from the University of Texas twenty years ago.  One would be incorrect in making that assumption. I actually honed my craft under the austere tutelage of my great-grandmother. She was a Master People-Watcher.

I lived for shopping downtown with Grandmama on hot summer days. I vividly remember my 5-year-old self, skipping beside her, darting in and out of dress shops, shoe boutiques and Woolworth’s, just taking in the sights and feeling fine. After ducking into the bakery for chocolate éclairs and a carton of milk, every trip culminated on a bench in the middle of the action, where we enjoyed our treats and talked about the passersby, particularly the women and children.

For the complete story, click below:

http://www.examiner.com/black-culture-traditions-in-houston/sharing-the-art-of-people-watching-with-children

SHARON WATKINS-JONES is community college administrator, former special education teacher, wife of 17 years and mother of two school-age children in northwest Houston. Her primary interests are family-inclusive culture and arts, travel, politics, historical literature, Texas Longhorns and all things Disney.  She writes for the Houston Examiner as a featured columnist.  We have been friends since ‘the crib days.’

Don’t you wish you could help those with a broken spirit?  Well, you can.  The word healing really means to help make whole.  The search for wholeness is something shared by the Servant Leader and the followers.  The Servant Leader is aware that in order for a person to grow professionally and personally, that person must first be whole and not broken emotionally.  Learning to heal is a powerful force for transforming our lives and the lives of others.  One of the greatest strengths of Servant Leadership is the potential for healing one’s self and others.  Servant Leaders recognize that they have an opportunity (and a responsibility) to help those with broken spirits and those who are suffering.  What a powerful concept!  Just think about it for a minute, you and I have the ability to help heal a person and make him/her whole again.  Imagine that!

The characteristic of healing recognizes that people’s work lives and personal lives are integrated.  A leader must be willing and able to recognize people who are able to perform better at work because of (not apart from) their activities and relationships outside the work environment.  For example, the work performance of a person who is dealing with a personal problem will be directly impacted. The two worlds are related, even if we wish they weren’t at times.

In “The Servant as Leader,” Robert Greenleaf writes, “There is something subtle communicated to one who is being served and led if, implicit in the compact between the servant-leader and led is the understanding that the search for wholeness is something that they have.”  The concept of healing is central to the consciousness of most professions and is definitely central to the core of a Servant Leader.

Servant Leaders are people who others want to approach when something traumatic happens.  These leaders have developed a remarkable appreciation for the emotional health and spirit of others.  This appreciation for others’ spirit has helped the Servant Leader learn how to facilitate the healing process so that others gravitate toward them when emotional needs arise.  The ability to create an environment that encourages emotional mending is crucial for those who want to become great Servant Leaders.

This week’s lesson on Healing reminds us of the awesome responsibility we have as leaders both in our homes and in our workplaces. As stated in the Bible, (1 Corinthians 12:9 NKJV) “to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healings by the same Spirit.”  We have been blessed with the ability to break someone down or make them whole.  What do you choose?  Remember that one very important way to determine the effectiveness of a leader is to examine the followers.  Are they happy, have they grown professionally and personally under the leadership of the Servant Leader?  The following activities will help you promote your healing skills and lead you to becoming a more Servant Leader.  And….it just might make this world a better place.

Lesson #1 – Self Awareness

  • Recognize your own needs
  • Reflect daily on your personal and professional goals
  • Are you allowing and helping others to grow?
  • Be prepared to listen to others’ opinion of you

Lesson #2 – Cultivate Compassion

  • Discover what you have in common with other people
  • Seize opportunities to model sympathetic feelings for others
  • Practice your listening skills
  • Research problems around the world – learn more

Lesson #3 – Keep Your Emotions Under Control

  • Think before you act
  • Listen to calming music
  • Read an uplifting article
  • Set up your workplace to encourage relaxation and production

Lesson #4 – Random Acts of Kindness

  • When ordering in a drive thru, pay for the person’s order behind you
  • Randomly smile at strangers
  • Help someone carry their groceries to the car
  • Make and anonymous donation to a charity of your choice

Lesson #5 – Develop Your Emotional Intelligence

  • Develop an appetite for learning
  • Inspire good feelings through pleasant social interactions
  • Reflect on people who model healing, such as Mother Teresa
  • Have an open mind and positive mental attitude

Barbara Baggerly-Hinojosa is a mother, educator, and wife living in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas.  She is a PhD student with Our Lady of the Lake University in Leadership Studies.  Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa is the CEO of the Leadership Empowerment Group and is currently researching the relationship between the leadership of the high school principal and the high school drop out rate.  This article is an excerpt from the self published book, Are You A Ten?  The Ten Characteristics of a Servant Leader. For ordering information, please contact Mrs. Baggerly-Hinojosa at Barb313679@aol.com.